Justia Business Law Opinion Summaries

Articles Posted in Delaware Court of Chancery
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The Court of Chancery granted Plaintiff's motion for the issuance of a letter of request to obtain the assistance of the central authority in Switzerland to obtain electronic data that Swiss investigators seized from the law office of defendant Dieter Neupert while investigating whether Neupert falsified evidence in a Switzerland civil proceeding, holding that Plaintiff was entitled to relief.In granting the motion, the Court of Chancery held that Plaintiff showed that issuance of the letter of request was warranted. Specifically, the Court concluded that Plaintiff met her burden of convincing the issuing court to ask a foreign court for assistance by showing that the letter of request was targeted and appropriate, that it would be difficult to obtain the information through other means, that the crime/fraud exception to privilege issues applied, and that Neupert would not produce the discovery materials if he had them. View "In re Cote d'Azur Estate Corp." on Justia Law

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The Court of Chancery granted Selling Stockholders' motion for partial judgment on the pleadings in this action brought after Corporation sold assets to Buyer and Buyer placed a portion of the consideration in escrow to fund any purchase price adjustment and to secure indemnification obligations, holding that there was no contractual basis for maintaining the funds in escrow.The asset purchase agreement in this case appointed Corporation's former CEO as the sellers' representative for purposes of making decisions about the escrowed funds, but the period for holding the escrowed funds had expired, and no claims against the escrowed funds remained outstanding. Selling Stockholders' filed this action against the former CEO asserting a series of claims designed to compel the release of the escrowed funds. The Court of Chancery granted relief, holding (1) the former CEO must exercise his discretionary authority over the release of the escrowed funds, but he must exercise that authority consistent with the implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing; and (2) the order implementing this ruling will provide for the release of funds from escrow on a date not earlier than sixty days after the judgment becomes final. View "American Healthcare Administrative Services, Inc. v. Aizen" on Justia Law

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The Court of Chancery granted in part a motion for emergency post-judgment relief filed by Stream TV Networks, Inc. seeking an order canceling Hawk Investment Holding, Ltd.'s ownership of 1,000 shares of Technovative Media Inc.'s common stock, holding that Hawk and SeeCubic, Inc. engaged in contumacious conduct warranting relief.In this action, Stream argued that SeeCubic and Hawk acted in concert to transfer one hundred percent of the shares at issue from SeeCubic to Hawk and that this conduct was contumacious because the court had made clear in several rulings that SeeCubic was required to transfer its assets to Stream. The Court of Chancery held (1) SeeCubic and Hawk engaged in contumacious conduct, and Shad Stastney pulled the strings; and (2) as a remedy, this Court cancels Hawk's purported ownership of the shares and vested ownership in Stream. View "In re Stream TV Networks, Inc. Omnibus Agreement Litigation" on Justia Law

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In this opinion, the Court of Appeals suggested reconsidering the holding of CompoSecure, LLC v. CardUX, LLC (CompoSecure II), 206 A.3d 807 (Del. 2018), and permitting a court of equity to consider equitable defenses to a breach of contract claim even when the parties have used the word "void" to describe the consequence of contractual noncompliance.Defendant, a co-founder and member of XRI Investment Holdings LLC (XRI), formed GH Blue Holdings, LLC as a single-member LLC and then transferred all of his Class B units in XRI to Blue (the Blue Transfer). Defendant sought to comply with a provision in the LLC agreement that governed XRI's internal affairs that generally prohibited members from transferring their member interests by evoking an exception for a transfer to a "Permitted Transferee." XRI alleged that the Blue Transfer was void ab initio and never became effective, and Defendant responded that XRI's claim was barred by the equitable defense of acquiescence. The Court of Chancery held (1) there was no impediment to a defendant raising a defense of acquiescence in response to a legal claim; and (2) this decision sets out the rationale for a court to reconsider the holding in CompoSecure II so that the Delaware Supreme Court may consider it in connection with any appeal. View "XRI Investment Holdings LLC v. Holifield" on Justia Law

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The Court of Chancery held Gregory Holifield violated an agreement by forming GH Blue Holdings, LLC (Blue) as a single-member LLC and then transferring all of his Class B units in XRI Investment Holdings, LLC (XRI), of which he was a co-founder and member, to Blue (the Blue Transfer) was void while the law required this result, it was contrary to the equities of the case.The LLC agreement that governed XRI's internal affairs (the LLC agreement) contained a provision generally prohibiting members from transferring their member interests (the No Transfer Provision) and that any such transfer is void. XRI asserted that the Blue Transfer was void ab initio and never became effective, and Holifield responded that XRI's claim was barred by the equitable defense of acquiescence. The Court of Chancery agreed with Holifield, holding Holifield satisfied all of the requirements to prove the defense of acquiescence. In this decision, the Court set out rationale to support an approach to the issue that does not currently reflect Delaware law and ordered the parties to submit a final order as to form. View "XRI Investment Holdings LLC v. Holifield" on Justia Law

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The Court of Chancery denied Jessica Puathasnanon's motion to dismiss this action pursuant to Rule 12(b)(2), holding that Puathasnanon was subject to personal jurisdiction in Delaware for purposes of the claims asserted in this case.Hudson Vegas Investment SPV, LLC sued various defendants, including Puathasnanon, the general counsel and chief legal officer of P3 Health Group Holdings, LLC, asserting that Puathasnanon breached the fiduciary duties she owed to P3 and its members. Puathasnanon filed a motion to dismiss, asserting that the court could not exercise personal jurisdiction over her. The Court of Chancery denied the motion to dismiss, holding that the exercise of personal jurisdiction over Puathasnanon comported with minimum standards of due process. View "In re P3 Health Group Holdings, LLC" on Justia Law

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The Court of Chancery granted summary judgment in favor of Respondents and confirmed a May 10, 2021 arbitration award, holding that this court was obliged to grant Respondents' cross-motion for summary judgment to confirm the award.Respondent commenced an arbitration proceeding against Petitioner asserting several claims relating to amendments to the parties' LLC agreement. After the arbitrator issued decisions, Petitioner filed a petition to vacate the award in part. Respondent and affiliated entities filed a counterclaim to confirm the arbitration award. All parties moved for summary judgment. The Court of Chancery granted summary judgment in favor of Respondents and confirmed the arbitration award, holding that Petitioner's challenges to the award failed. View "Polychain Capital LP v. Pantera Venture Fund II LP" on Justia Law

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The Court of Chancery granted Plaintiff's motion for summary judgment seeking an order confirming the arbitration panel's award in this case and denied Defendants' motion for summary judgment seeking to vacate the award, holding that there was no basis to vacate the arbitration panel's award.Defendants initiated arbitration proceedings against Plaintiff to challenge the validity of unsuitability determination that Plaintiff issued to Defendants under the parties' agreement. The arbitration panel determined that the unsuitability determination was valid. This litigation followed. The Court of Chancery confirmed the arbitration award, holding that Defendants were not entitled to relief on their allegations of error. View "MHP Management, LLC v. DTR MHP Management, LLC" on Justia Law

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Evans served as CEO and a director of Avande, a privately held Delaware corporation that provides medical claims management services to insurance companies and healthcare organizations. Following Evans’s termination, Avande performed an audit and discovered suspect transactions undertaken by Evans while he was serving as CEO. Avande filed suit, alleging breach of fiduciary duty based on alleged self-dealing transactions and improper expenditures and tortious interference, defamation, and conversion based on acts that Evans allegedly committed after his termination. Evans was found liable for about $65,000 in damages, plus interest. Evans demanded advancement for expenses incurred in connection with the action.The Delaware Chancery court entered judgment in favor of Avande. Avande established that there is no causal link between Evans’s status as a former officer of Avande and the tortious inference and defamation claims; those claims solely concerned Evans’s post-termination conduct. Avande demonstrated that Evans did not succeed but was found liable. View "Evans v. Avande, Inc." on Justia Law

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The Court of Chancery denied Defendants' motion to dismiss this complaint for failure to state a claim upon which relief could be granted, holding that Plaintiff's claims were ripe and that the complaint stated claims for breach of contract, breach of fiduciary duty, and unjust enrichment.Plaintiff, a stockholder of a company, brought this lawsuit alleging that Defendants breached the terms of an equity compensation plan, that Defendants breached their fiduciary duties, and unjust enrichment. Defendants moved to dismiss the complaint in its entirety, arguing that none of Plaintiff's claims were ripe and that Plaintiff failed to state a claim. The Court of Chancery denied the motion to dismiss, holding that Defendants' attacks on the complaint were unavailing. View "Garfield v. Allen" on Justia Law